“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait. Jack R. “Ray” Hayes.
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait
“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait

“WHY MARINES LIKE CUBA” – An archive of approximately 350 photographs and a half-dozen documents relating to a Marine Corporal’s eight years of service, primarily in Cuba and Hait

Guantanamo, Cuba and Port au Prince Haiti: 1930s. Album. This archive includes a packet of enlistment, promotion, and discharge documents for Jack R. Hayes, as well as a photograph album documenting his service at Guantanamo Bay and a collection of loose photographs from time spent at Port au Prince. The documents are in nice shape. The photographs of Cuba are in an album, attached with corner mounts; many of the pages are captioned in white ink. The album cover is in nice shape, but all of its pages are loose. The Haiti photographs have all been removed from an album and have page remnants on their reverse. Most have captions written on the image with a ballpoint pen, probably by Hayes’s wife when they were removed from their scrapbook. There are also several loose photographs of an older Hayes wearing a 1940s Navy uniform one of which is captioned “Ray when war was over”. The documents include a 1931 baptismal letter from the “Post Chaplain”at Parris Island, 1933 Private First Class promotion certificate from Haiti, 1933 certificate providing Hayes with a “Technical Warrant for Signal Duty”, 1935 Honorable Discharge with a reenlistment annotation, 1936 Corporal promotion certificate from Quantico, and undated letter from the Marine Corps League requesting that Hayes join. The album contains about 60 leaves, two-thirds of which are detached from the binding There are about 300 b/w photographs (several are tinted and a few are real photo post cards) ranging in size from 1.5” x 2.5” to 7” x 4.75”. The images show all facets of a Marine life at Guantanamo Bay. They include Marines in formations and casual poses in a variety of uniforms, Rifle and pistol ranges, Base facilities, Naval vessels including battleships and submarines, Aircraft, shark fishing, beach combing, swimming, tennis, boxing, civilian hotels and bars, island scenery, and lots of women including one undressing under a palm tree that is captioned “Why marines like Cuba”. There are about 30 loose photos, primarily from Haiti, most ranging in size between 4” x 2.5” and 6.25” x 4”. The images include Several shots of government buildings including one captioned, “Palace in Port au Prince / Ray and 100 Marines guarded it in 1931-1932 to keep their leader from being assinated”, Scenery, Ruins of old French forts, Mess hall tables decorated for Christmas, A Thompson submachine gun, A locomotive wreck, Communications equipment, and Radio towers. Online military records at the National Archives show that Hayes enlisted in 1931 and went to boot camp at Parris Island. He was then assigned to Guantanamo and received communication training. While there, he deployed, possibly twice, to preserve order Haiti. He returned to Quantico and served a short time at Marine Corps Headquarters in Washington before reassignment to the 15th Marine Regiment at San Diego. He was discharged as a Corporal in 1939. No records showed his World War II naval service. Very good. Item #009724

An extensive, first-hand, visual record detailing a Marine’s life in 1930s Cuba and Haiti.

Price: $400.00