A FRIEND ANNOUNCES HIS UPCOMING VISIT VIA THE BOSTON & VERMONT TELEGRAPH COMPANY – Telegraph message sent from Camden, Maine to Vernon, Vermont. J. L. Lee.
A FRIEND ANNOUNCES HIS UPCOMING VISIT VIA THE BOSTON & VERMONT TELEGRAPH COMPANY – Telegraph message sent from Camden, Maine to Vernon, Vermont.
A FRIEND ANNOUNCES HIS UPCOMING VISIT VIA THE BOSTON & VERMONT TELEGRAPH COMPANY – Telegraph message sent from Camden, Maine to Vernon, Vermont.

A FRIEND ANNOUNCES HIS UPCOMING VISIT VIA THE BOSTON & VERMONT TELEGRAPH COMPANY – Telegraph message sent from Camden, Maine to Vernon, Vermont.

Camden, Maine to Vernon, Vermont: March 20, 1862. Envelope or Cover. Telegraph message on Vermont & Boston Telegraph Company letterhead enclosed in an illustrated Vermont & Boston Telegraph Company envelope that features an American eagle posing in front of a pair of cherubim or putti spinning the earth as bolts of electricity spring from their fingers. The letterhead records that the telegram was sent from Camden to Mr. Addison Meiltieau (?). No postal markings as after the telegraph was received in Vernon, it would have been carried to the local ad

The message announces the sender’s expected arrival day in Vernon. Item #009680

The Vermont and Boston Telegraph Company was founded in 1848 and eventually stretched between Boston, Massachusetts and Montreal. It used the Bain telegraphy system, a rival of the one developed by Samuel Morse, until it was acquired by Western Union in 1866.

The Bain system employed a chemical telegraph." The novelty was the receiver, consisting of a disc of paper moistened with a potassium ferrocyanide and ammonium nitrate solution and resting on an iron plate, on which a stylus traced a spiral as the iron plate was turned by clockwork. Whenever a current flowed, and only a very small current was required, electrolysis caused the formation of iron ferrocyanide, or Prussian blue, and a mark was made on the disc. It looked much like a disc record player of many years later. Bain even constructed a new code of dots and dashes which was purposely different from the Vail (Morse) Code. At least one Bain character found its way into the later Morse Code, as well as his numbers, and there is a logical reason for this. Unlike the Morse register, the Bain receiver was completely quiet, so Bain needed some kind of alarm, and he devised one as far from looking like anything Morse as could be.

Later Bain telegraphs used a paper strip instead of the disc, and an iron stylus instead of the iron plate. Potassium iodide could also be used as the chemical, in which case electrolysis would free iodine, and make a brown stain instead of a blue one. Bain originated automatic sending with a perforated paper tape in 1846. Apertures in the form of dots and dashes were made in the tape, which was run between a conducting brush and roller. Electrolytic reception can be very fast, since there is no mechanical or electrical inertia. However, the inconvenience of maintaining a moist tape led to its disuse” (“Bain, House and Other Telegraphs” at Calvert’s The Electromagnetic Telegraph online).

Price: $100.00

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