[TURNED MAIL FROM A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY EARLY IN THE CIVIL WAR]; Envelope that was mailed twice, the first time using U.S. postage, the second with a Confederate stamp. Dr. Conway Whittle.

[TURNED MAIL FROM A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY EARLY IN THE CIVIL WAR]; Envelope that was mailed twice, the first time using U.S. postage, the second with a Confederate stamp

Richmond, Virginia to Whittle’s Mills, Virginia, then Whittle’s Mills to Charlottesville, Virginia: April 1861. Envelope or Cover. This 3-cent U.S. stamped envelope (Scott #U10) was sent from Richmond to Dr. Conway Whittle at Whittle’s Mills and bears a Richmond postmark dated 28 April 1861. Whittle turned it inside-out, franked it with a Confederate 10-cent stamp (CSA #12), and mailed it to Charlottesville. This second post bears a manuscript "Whittle’s Mills" postmark dated “Oct 18”; the stamp has a pen cancel. The cover has been split on two sides so both postings can be seen. The backflap is torn. No letter. Very good. Item #009631

When the cover was first mailed, the use of a U.S. stamped envelope was appropriate. When it was re-used, Confederate postage was required.

Virginia succeeded from the Union on 17 April 1861 and became an independent state. It did not join the Confederacy until May 7th. Despite its secession, Virginia post offices continued to work with the U.S. Post Office and use U.S. stamps and stamped envelopes until the Confederate Post Office took over complete operations on June 1st.

Whittle’s Mill was built in 1756 on the bank of the Meherrin River not far from present-day South Hall. The mill passed through several owners until purchased by Colonel William Davis, a hero of the Revolution. His daughter married Fortescue Whittle, a wealthy refugee from the Irish Rebellion, and the property remained in family hands for nearly a century. The Whittles owned a nearby plantation, tavern, granary, distillery, and store in addition to running the local post office. They had 14 children including Commodore William Conway Whittle, Senator James Murray Whittle, Dr. Conway Davies Whittle, and Bishop Francis M. Whittle. Their youngest son, Colonel Powhatan Bolling Whittle, commanded the 38th Virginia Infantry and during Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg setting the famous "High Water Mark of the Confederacy." Commodore Whittle's son, William C. Whittle, Jr., was the executive officer of the CSS Shenandoah, which destroyed the Union whaling fleet in Arctic waters and fired the final shots of the Civil War. (See “Max Bagley Crowder Memorial Park at Whittle's Mill” at the Southern Virginia Homefront website.)

An uncommon, mixed-use turned cover from a prominent Virginia family posted in the early days of the Civil War.

Price: $750.00

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