[Turned stampless letter regarding farmland in Kentucky and the possibility of purchasing a “Negro boy”] Letter written in Octorora, Pennsylvania and posted at Rising Sun, Maryland, for delivery to Philadelphia and forwarding to Easton, Maryland. Jno Hall to John Ewing via Samuel Ewing, Jack.
[Turned stampless letter regarding farmland in Kentucky and the possibility of purchasing a “Negro boy”] Letter written in Octorora, Pennsylvania and posted at Rising Sun, Maryland, for delivery to Philadelphia and forwarding to Easton, Maryland
[Turned stampless letter regarding farmland in Kentucky and the possibility of purchasing a “Negro boy”] Letter written in Octorora, Pennsylvania and posted at Rising Sun, Maryland, for delivery to Philadelphia and forwarding to Easton, Maryland

[Turned stampless letter regarding farmland in Kentucky and the possibility of purchasing a “Negro boy”] Letter written in Octorora, Pennsylvania and posted at Rising Sun, Maryland, for delivery to Philadelphia and forwarding to Easton, Maryland

Octorora to Rising Sun to Philadelphia to Easton: November 1809. Envelope or Cover. This stampless letter measures approximately 8” x 13”. It was datelined “Octorora Nov. 14th 1809” and addressed to Samuel Ewing in Philadelphia. It bears a manuscript “Rising Sun Nov 14. 1809” postmark and “10” rate mark. In compliance with Hall’s request within the letter, Samuel Ewing readdressed the missive to John (Jack) Ewing in Easton, Maryland. When reposted, it received a second manuscript “10” rate mark and a small circle Philadelphia postmark, “PHI / 16 / NO”. There are minor 1” splits at two mailing folds and a near invisible archival reinforcement along a third. There is a dime-sized hole in the center of the text from opening the wax-seal.

Hall intended the ultimate recipient of this letter to be Jack (John) Ewing, however he first sent it to Samuel Ewing for information and asked that he forward it to John. In the letter Hall discusses several issues regarding “our lands in Kentucky,” which he apparently owned partnership with the Ewings. However, its most interesting part is the advice provided about purchasing a slave,

“With respect to a Negro boy there is none to be had here, in Balto they are frequently advertised for sale, you had better get Jack Hall (must be a different person than the author) to buy you one.”. Very good. Item #009630

Octorora was (and still is) a small area in southeastern Pennsylvania that took its name from an Indian settlement along a creek near the present-day town of Parkesburg. Although a Presbyterian church was built there in 1720, contact with the outside world was limited to the nearby Philadelphia-Baltimore stagecoach road, and the closet postal drop was at the Rising Sun Tavern in Maryland, a major stopping point along the route.. Hall’s letter, no doubt, was carried to the tavern for dispatch by stage to Philadelphia where it was read by Samuel, who, in turn, forwarded it on to John (Jack) in Easton. (See “Origins of Rising Sun” at the Rising Sun town website, Futhey and Copes History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, and “History” at the Upper Octorora Presbyterian Church website.)

A very nice example of an uncommon turned letter carried through was then mostly unsettled wilderness; made even more interesting by its discussion of a slave purchase.

Price: $300.00