[AN EARLY ALABAMA SETTLER EXPRESSES OUTRAGE THAT UNSCRUPULUS WHITE LAND SPECULATORS HAVE CHEATED MANY CREEKS OUT OF THEIR LAND BUT RESOLVES HIMSELF TO GOING TO WAR AGAINST THE TRIBE SINCE IT HAS INDISCRIMINATELY ATTACKED ALL WHITES INSTEAD OF THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR SUFFERING]; Letter from an Alabama merchant to his sister in New York. E. Lockwood to Jane Lockwood.
[AN EARLY ALABAMA SETTLER EXPRESSES OUTRAGE THAT UNSCRUPULUS WHITE LAND SPECULATORS HAVE CHEATED MANY CREEKS OUT OF THEIR LAND BUT RESOLVES HIMSELF TO GOING TO WAR AGAINST THE TRIBE SINCE IT HAS INDISCRIMINATELY ATTACKED ALL WHITES INSTEAD OF THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR SUFFERING]; Letter from an Alabama merchant to his sister in New York
[AN EARLY ALABAMA SETTLER EXPRESSES OUTRAGE THAT UNSCRUPULUS WHITE LAND SPECULATORS HAVE CHEATED MANY CREEKS OUT OF THEIR LAND BUT RESOLVES HIMSELF TO GOING TO WAR AGAINST THE TRIBE SINCE IT HAS INDISCRIMINATELY ATTACKED ALL WHITES INSTEAD OF THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR SUFFERING]; Letter from an Alabama merchant to his sister in New York

[AN EARLY ALABAMA SETTLER EXPRESSES OUTRAGE THAT UNSCRUPULUS WHITE LAND SPECULATORS HAVE CHEATED MANY CREEKS OUT OF THEIR LAND BUT RESOLVES HIMSELF TO GOING TO WAR AGAINST THE TRIBE SINCE IT HAS INDISCRIMINATELY ATTACKED ALL WHITES INSTEAD OF THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR SUFFERING]; Letter from an Alabama merchant to his sister in New York

Prairie Bluff, Alabama to Charlton, New York: May 25, 1836. Envelope or Cover. This three-page stampless folded letter from “E. Lockwood” measures 15.5” x 9.75” unfolded. It is datelined “Prairie Bluff May 25th 1836”. It is addressed to “Miss Jane Lockwood / Charlton / Saratoga Co. / N.Y.” There are no postal markings; the text notes it was to be delivered by a friend. In nice shape. Transcript included.

The letter reads in part:

“A draft is ordered to take place . . . to raise troops to fight the Creek Indians. . .. How long the contest will continue is unknown. . .. I cannot well leave without sacrificing much. . .. But when our country calls we must go out to battle! The Creeks are strong – their force is estimated [to be] ten thousand warriers . . . they will give Alabama a hard struggle. The mail has ceased to run from Columbus to Montgomery for some time. . .. The last stage that attempted to come through was stopped by . . . & all the passengers except one murdered. . .. [The Creeks] are dissatisfied . . .. The Whites have got all their lands & they are left destitute & desperate. In very many instances they have been cheated out of their lands & they know & are disposed to revenge themselves for the knavery of the whites which . . . would be not more than strict justice provided they would kill none except those who had practised the most rank frauds upon them. . .. The white land speculators are very much the cause of this war – their acts have been the most unwarrantable & unjust . . . & the Indians in order to satiate their revenge are waging war with every white man they can find. I can tell you more . . . if I should survive. . ..”. Very good. Item #009625

Lockwood’s letter summarizes the causes of the Second Creek War and typifies the empathy felt by many Alabamans until some Creek bands began indiscriminately massacring whites. Some Creeks were dissatisfied with the treaties signed by their leaders following the First Creek war where the tribe received $350,000 in exchange for much of their tribal land, and each family received at least a half-square-mile homestead in return. Compounding the tension, land speculators began buying up the Creek homesteads below their market value and reselling them to white settlers. Worse, squatters flooded the area as well.

President Andrew Jackson sent Francis Scott Key to investigate. Key confirmed the situation was worse than reported, however the situation was out-out-control and could not be stopped.

Outrage in some Creek bands exploded into indiscriminate warfare. Farms were razed, families were slaughtered, and an entire town was massacred and burned to the ground. The Alabama militia fought skirmishes with these Creek war parties until General Winfield Scott arrived with Army regulars and along with the Upper Creek Nation, defeated the warring bands.

By 1837, the war was over, and President Jackson ordered the Army to march 15,000 Creeks from Alabama to the Indian Territory, a distance of 750 miles, and over 3,500 perished along the route.(For more information see Ellisor’s The Second Creek War. . ., and Kane’s “Second Creek War” at the Encyclopedia Alabama.)

A very scarce sympathetic, but resolute, first person account about the origin of the Second Creek War. At the time of this listing, there is nothing similar for sale in the trade, the Rare Book Hub shows no nothing similar sold at auction, and OCLC identifies only one institution with some similar letters.

Price: $900.00