[A JEWISH CAPTAIN IN THE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY OMINOUSLY PROMISES A GEORGIA LAWYER HE WILL SOON PAY A VISIT TO “SETTLE MY BUSINESS WITH YOU . . . FOR THE MANNER WHICH YOU HAVE ACTED TOWARDS ME.”]; A short, but threatening, letter sent by a prominent Jewish Confederate cavalry officer to a lawyer in his hometown of Columbus, Georgia. Captain Edwin Warren Moise to Colonel Seaborn Jones.
[A JEWISH CAPTAIN IN THE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY OMINOUSLY PROMISES A GEORGIA LAWYER HE WILL SOON PAY A VISIT TO “SETTLE MY BUSINESS WITH YOU . . . FOR THE MANNER WHICH YOU HAVE ACTED TOWARDS ME.”]; A short, but threatening, letter sent by a prominent Jewish Confederate cavalry officer to a lawyer in his hometown of Columbus, Georgia
[A JEWISH CAPTAIN IN THE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY OMINOUSLY PROMISES A GEORGIA LAWYER HE WILL SOON PAY A VISIT TO “SETTLE MY BUSINESS WITH YOU . . . FOR THE MANNER WHICH YOU HAVE ACTED TOWARDS ME.”]; A short, but threatening, letter sent by a prominent Jewish Confederate cavalry officer to a lawyer in his hometown of Columbus, Georgia

[A JEWISH CAPTAIN IN THE CONFEDERATE CAVALRY OMINOUSLY PROMISES A GEORGIA LAWYER HE WILL SOON PAY A VISIT TO “SETTLE MY BUSINESS WITH YOU . . . FOR THE MANNER WHICH YOU HAVE ACTED TOWARDS ME.”]; A short, but threatening, letter sent by a prominent Jewish Confederate cavalry officer to a lawyer in his hometown of Columbus, Georgia

Camp French [near New Hanover, North Carolina] to Columbus, Georgia: 1862. Envelope or Cover. This one-page letter is datelined, “Camp French Aug 10/62”. It was sent by Captain Edwin Warren Moise to Colonel Seaborn Jones at Columbus, Georgia. It is enclosed in its original mailing envelope which has a blue manuscript endorsement “Soldiers Letter / from Captain E. W. Moise / Clairborne’s Regiment” and a black manuscript “Due 10” rate mark. There is a handstamped circular postmark that reads “Wilson / Aug / 10 / N.C.” near the left margin. In nice shape with some minor soiling. Transcript included.

Captain Moise’s letter reads in part:

“Your letter by Mr Cox has come to hand. . .. I will apply for leave to go home for a few days when I will settle my Business with you. . .. I can see no reason for the manner which you have acted towards me. You have shewn a distrust of me – which I never deserved. I hope you will now remain in peace until I come, which will be in two or three weeks and then I will shew you – how groundless and unjust has been your complaint of me.”

It is unclear from the letter exactly why Captain Moise felt slandered by the much older and non-serving Col Sanborn, however before the war both men had been influential members of the Columbus community, so perhaps antebellum animosity bubbled-over after Moise had funded his own cavalry unit a month earlier and joined it with the Confederate Army. It is also unclear whether the men amicably or with a duel. Very good. Item #009607

Edwin Moise was born into a prominent Sephardic Jewish family in Charleston, South Carolina in 1832. After his marriage to Esther Lyon of Petersburg, Virginia, in 1854, the couple settled in Columbus, Georgia, where he studied law under his uncle, Raphael J. Moses, while assisting in the management of Moses’s plantation and flour mill.

Although Moise was a staunch Unionist, once war came he volunteered for Confederate service and organized a local cavalry company, named Moise’s Rangers. While a number of Jews served in the Confederate Army, not many possessed the horsemanship skills needed to become cavalrymen. Only a few units in Confederate Army were organized by Southern Jews.

The Rangers totaled 120 men, 50 of whom Moise mounted and equipped at his own expense, completely depleting his entire fortune of $10,000. Moise’s Rangers joined with Claiborne’s Regiment of Partisan Rangers and once the units formally joined the Confederate Army, they were renamed. Claiborne’s Partisans became the 7th Confederate Cavalry, of which Moise’s Rangers were Company A.

In 1863, Moise was promoted to Major and was one of the leaders of the famous “Beefsteak Raid” that captured more than 2,000 head of Union cattle to feed the besieged Confederate garrison at Peterburg, Virginia. By the end of the war, Moise was awaiting a promotion to Colonel for his performance at the Battle of Burgess Hill that had been approved by General Robert E. Lee.

Penniless after the war, Moise resettled in Sumter, South Carolina, were he became a very successful attorney and farmer. A moderate on racial issues, while serving as the state’s Adjutant General during the last half of the 1870s, he integrated the South Carolina Militia.

Moise’s Uncle Raphael, a major during the wary, served as the Commissary Officer for the state of Georgia and executed the last official order of the Confederate government; he withdrew $40,000 in gold and silver bullion from the Treasury and, heavily protected by trusted guards, distributed it among the defeated Confederate soldiers as they straggled home. (For more information see the South Carolina Encyclopedia, the Jewish Encyclopedia, the New Georgia Encyclopedia, and Fold3; all are available online.)

Seaborn Jones, born in 1788, was a wealthy Columbus attorney and ally of Andrew Jackson who served two terms as a Representative in Congress. While Jones title as ‘Colonel’ was honorary, he may have been appointed as a Confederate officer late in the war.

Exceptionally scarce Judaic and Confederate military history. At the time of this listing, nothing similar is for sale in the trade. OCLC identifies only one similar item a collection the Ullman Family Papers, jointly held by the Library of Congress and the Western Reserve Historical Society, that includes a letter from a Jewish Confederate soldier who was tried as a smuggler and spy by the Union Army after attempting to sell two bales of cotton in Memphis. The Rare Book Hub reports the auction of only one similar item, a diary/record book kept by a Jewish soldier in the Black Hawk Rifle Company of the 22nd Mississippi Infantry Regiment sold at auction in 2004 for $14,850 (equivalent to about $20,200 today.

Price: $2,000.00