[A SLAVE CARRIES MAIL BETWEEN A FUTURE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA AND AN ELDERLY FEMALE MEMBER OF A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY]; Letter carried by the slave, Richard, from R. C. L. Moncure to his mistress. R. C. L. Moncure.
[A SLAVE CARRIES MAIL BETWEEN A FUTURE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA AND AN ELDERLY FEMALE MEMBER OF A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY]; Letter carried by the slave, Richard, from R. C. L. Moncure to his mistress
[A SLAVE CARRIES MAIL BETWEEN A FUTURE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA AND AN ELDERLY FEMALE MEMBER OF A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY]; Letter carried by the slave, Richard, from R. C. L. Moncure to his mistress
[A SLAVE CARRIES MAIL BETWEEN A FUTURE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA AND AN ELDERLY FEMALE MEMBER OF A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY]; Letter carried by the slave, Richard, from R. C. L. Moncure to his mistress

[A SLAVE CARRIES MAIL BETWEEN A FUTURE JUDGE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF VIRGINIA AND AN ELDERLY FEMALE MEMBER OF A PROMINENT VIRGINIA FAMILY]; Letter carried by the slave, Richard, from R. C. L. Moncure to his mistress

. Stafford, Virginia to Buck Hall (Buckhall), Prince William County, Virginia: 1840. Envelope or Cover. This one-page, stampless folded letter measures approximately 13” x 8” unfolded. It is datelined, “Stafford Sept. 4 : 1840” and addressed to “Mrs. Mary A. Hoole / Buck Hall / Prince William / V.” It contains no postal markings, however “By Richard” appears in manuscript in the lower left corner of the cover. In nice shape with some light toning and a vertical storage crease. Transcript provided.

The distance between the Moncure and Hooe plantations was approximately thirty miles.

In the text of this letter regarding the payment of a debt, Moncure, a Stafford County lawyer, informs 83-year-old Mrs. Hooe at Buckhall that he is using her slave, Richard, to carry this letter to her along with thirty dollars to tide her over until he can make a personal visit and deliver the rest of a payment that will settle her account.

“I have rcd by Richard your boy Dade’s letter of the 3d instant saying that you were in need of money & requesting me to send some by the Bearer. I accordingly sent you by the bearer thirty dollars which I hope will answer your purposes until I can see you which will be at or before the Inferior Court of Prince William." Very good. Item #009606

Richard Cassius Lee Moncure, a prominent Stafford County attorney who was eventually appointed to what would become the Supreme Court of Virginia, was a member of one of the “First Families of Virginia”. He was born and grew up on the Claremont Plantation, just above Aquia Spring in Stafford County, Virginia, on land that was later seized by the federal government to enlarge Quantico Marine Corps Base during the early years of World War Two. At the time of this letter, Moncure and his wife owned Glencaire, a 1,000-acre plantation, just north of the Rappahannock River near the present town of Falmouth.

Mary A. Hooe, was a member of a prominent colonial family that settled in Virginia during the mid-1600s and established a large plantation, Hazel Plain, at Buck Hall (Buckhall) in Prince William County, Virginia. (Genealogies of Virginia Families indexed by Judith McGhan show that Mary Ann Hooe was born at Buckhall on 7 Nov 1756.) Today, Buckhall, a wealthy suburb of Manassas, is a part of the Washington DC exburbs.

The Dades were another prominent early family.

Richard, was one of the Hooe family slaves of which several online sources report there were “dozens”.

Quite a statement of its time. Slave-carried mail is very scarce. We only sold three others over the last twenty years. At the time of this listing, there are no others for sale in the trade, and OCLC shows none are held by institutions (although one is in the collection at Brown University). No auction records are listed at the Rare Book Hub, however one slave-delivered military envelope without contents has been sold at a philatelic auction.

Price: $1,750.00

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