Letter from a British immigrant to her mother at home in Surrey about her journey to Cleveland where she and her husband have temporarily settled. M. L. Heatuaris.
Letter from a British immigrant to her mother at home in Surrey about her journey to Cleveland where she and her husband have temporarily settled

Letter from a British immigrant to her mother at home in Surrey about her journey to Cleveland where she and her husband have temporarily settled

Cleveland, Ohio: 1840. Envelope or Cover. This four-page letter is dated July 29, 1840 and postmarked in Cleveland the following day. It has a red “PAID” handstamp and blue “25” manuscript rate mark indicating the cost to send the cover to New York with a red circular transit handstamp dated Aug 3 was applied. There it was carried on the Blue Swallowtail’s packet ship, “Independence” to Liverpool. (See Pullen, p. 244.) A two-line “Liverpool / Ship Letter” receiving mark and a September 9th London Penny Post handstamp are on the reverse. Criss-cross writing, but legible. A transcript will be provided. The letter is in nice shape. In this densely written letter, apparently the second since she arrived in the United States, a daughter writes home telling of her travel from Buffalo to Cleveland: “We reached this city from Buffalo in about twenty four hours without accident save the breaking of the rudder . . .. I spent the greater part of the 24 hours in bed . . . e a rolling cross sea making me and most on board very sick. These boats call at all the principal places on the Lake shore for passengers goods & also for a supply of fuel for burning wood. . .. This creates very considerable delay. . .. These towns are . . . all pleasantly situated . . . at or very near the mouth of a river . . . they vary as to hill & valley but are all fertile. This is one of the pleasantest places we have been at, indeed except Cattskill . . .. [It is] said to contain 7 or 8,000 but it appears to us that 4 or 5,000 would be nearer to the mark,. . .. It is situated at the mouth of the Cuyahoga river (which is about as large as the Thames at Richmond, and winds beautifully / the shores of the lake rise considerably on both sides, affording very pleasant walks & fine sites for residences. . .. within 2 minutes walk of our abode, we can witness the sun set in the Lake [although] at present the heat will not admit for walking after 9 am until 6 pm. . .. I tell you that Thomas (you know what a cold subject he is) in the heat of the day, sitting still, perspired profusely, though wearing no cloth clothes & cotton socks. . .. The first very hot weather affected us both – me with . . . diarrhea, Thomas similarly [and also] flatulency.” She goes one to describe Cleveland’s churches in some detail, complain slightly about the “dear” prices of everything from meats to cucumbers, to flour to clothes washing and even the “making of a muslin dress, perfectly plain.” She does however remark on her surprise at finding no “loath want & distribution which are so rife in our own land & almost quite unknown here. We have never been asked for a half-penny since we landed nor seen a beggar.”. Very good. Item #009391

A young English woman’s detailed account of her travel to and first impressions of her new home in Cleveland, Ohio.

Price: $150.00