Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning. Yeoman Herbert E. Beattie.
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning
Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning

Small archive of material related to the only capture and destruction of a German U-Boat during World War One by an Allied vessel, the U.S.S. Fanning

Mostly 1917. Unbound. The collection consists of: 1) A carbon copy of the Commanding Officer’s (Lieutenant A. S Carpenter) report, “Engagement with, and destruction of German Submarine S.M.U-58,” 17 November, 1917. 10 pages. Includes A) a hand-drawn chart of the engagement and a list of German prisoners and deceased. B) A one-page mimeograph commendation from Vice Admiral William S. Sims awarded for “engaging and destroying German submarine. Dated November 24, 1917. C) A rotogravure newspaper photograph “Captors of a German Submarine Crew” showing the officers and men of the U.S.S. Fanning in dress uniforms posing on board the destroyer. The article mistakenly identifies the commanding officer as “A. S. Garner”. Undated, but 1917 from the “Southampton En”. D) A carbon-copy of the Commanding Officer’s (Lieutenant Commander J. H. Everson) report, “Report of the torpedoing and sinking of Collier ‘Baron Ailsa’,” 9 May. 1918. 4 pages. Includes a report of the Fanning’s rescue of the survivors, a list of the survivors, and a hand-drawn chart of the Fanning’s rescue search and attempt to damage the submarine with depth charges. E) A newspaper account titled “Destroyer Captor of Hun ‘Sub’ Here”. Dated August 28, 19[19]. Philadelphia Evening Bulletin. F) A newspaper account titled “Destroyer Fanning Junked; Sank U-Boat in World War”. Dated “7/6/34” Philadelphia newspaper, title unknown. 7) Seven real photograph postcards (RPPCs): 1) a view of the starboard size of the ship (in dazzle camouflage) titled “U.S.S. Fanning. In European Waters. 2) a view of the aft of the ship (in dazzle camouflage) titled “U.S.S. Fanning / ‘Base Six.’” The reverse of the photo is annotated “Notice the depth charges on the stern. . . . Notice the whie speck . . . at the top of the hill. . . there the Lusitania victims are buried.” 3 waves crashing over the ship’s bow. 4) a posed image of ten crew members (seamen and petty officers). 5-7) three different images of the rescue of survivors of the S.S. Madura, a British cargo ship [18 Oct 1917] – “Survivors coming along side,” Survivors from the S.S. Madura coming on Board U.S.S. Fanning, Survivors on board Fanning.” and G) A 17” x 14” Navy recruiting poster featuring the captured submarine and crew, “’We have met the enemy and they are ours’ / The Navy’s First U-Boat Capture / We got them Here they are, captured. . . . Lad! If you want action, get in the game and enlist in the Navy. . . .” The poster is annotated on the reverse, “This came from my father Herbert E. Beattie who participated as a Yeoman (sic) on the U.S.S. Fanning during the capture. / Robert Beattie.”. Very good. Item #009357

During World War I, Queenstown (now Cobh), Ireland was a naval base for British and American destroyers operating against the German submarines that were attacking allied shipping. The first group of American destroyers arrived in May of 1917, and their sailors became the first U.S. servicemen to enter combat during the war. When the destroyers (which were, at the time, little more than open boats) were met at the dock by Admiral Sir Lewis Bayly who, looking at the weather beaten men and ships, inquired when they could be put to use, the senior American officer, Commander Joseph Tausig replied, “We’re ready now, Sir!” An important collection of scarce and unique items from a morale -building victory early in the United States’ participation in World War One. As of 2019, now other examples of the official reports or orders for sale in the trade, have been offered at auction, or are held by institutions per OCLC. The Rare Book Hub shows that a logbook or the Fanning was sold at auction in 2008. It also shows two examples of the recruiting poster have been sold at auction. OCLC shows no institutions hold examples of the posters although a google search turns up several that do. One RPPC of the Fanning in dazzle camouflage is currently for sale on eBay. There are no eBay records of sale for the other RPPCs, neither are any listed as having been sold at auction or held in institutional collections.

Price: $950.00

See all items in History, Military, Transportation
See all items by