A stampless cover from an officer in the 57th Georgia Infantry Regiment posted at Vicksburg, Mississippi as a parolee after he was wounded and captured during the Battle of Champion Hill (Baker’s Creek). Lieutenant A. J. Miller, Andrew Jackson.

A stampless cover from an officer in the 57th Georgia Infantry Regiment posted at Vicksburg, Mississippi as a parolee after he was wounded and captured during the Battle of Champion Hill (Baker’s Creek)

Vicksburg, Mississippi: Company K, 57th Georgia Regiment, Jun 25 [1863].

This stampless cover was mailed by Miller from Vicksburg to a friend back home in Georgia. He has annotated it along the left edge, “From A J Miller / Co. K 57th Ga Rgt”. It bears a 25mm double-circle Vicksburg Miss postmark dated “Jun 25”. A “10” rate mark was handstamped next to the postmark indicating that it was sent 10-cents postage due. The rate mark has been covered over with ink cross-hatching probably applied when it was picked up and the post due fee was paid. The envelope shows some wear and is missing a small part of its back flap.

This a rather scarce Vicksburg postal marking. See page 121 in the Confederate States of America Catalog and Handbook of Stamps and Postal History. Item #009356

Company K of the 57th Georgia Infantry Regiment was known as the Oconne Greys. The regiment was organized in the spring of 1862 from residents of Troup, Peach, Montgomery, and Onconne Counties. It first served in Tennessee and Kentucky before being reassigned to T. H. Taylor’s Brigade where it was employed in the defense of Vicksburg. It fought in the bloody battle of Champion Hill (Baker’s Creek) twenty miles to the east of Vicksburg on 16 May 1863, the most important engagement during General Grant’s Vicksburg Campaign and considered by some to be the pivotal battle of the entire war. The Union needed to win to achieve ultimate victory, and the Confederacy needed a victory to survive. One of the Union commanders at the battle reported that it was a savage struggle; “It was literally a hill of death.” Following the Confederate Army’s decisive defeat, the siege of Vicksburg became inevitable, and the fate of the city was sealed

Official records show that Lieutenant Miller was captured during the Battle of Champion Hill after being critically wounded in the leg. He was immediately paroled and allowed to rejoin his unit which retreated into Vicksburg on the 2nd of June where it remained until the city fell on July 4th, and the entire regiment was forced to surrender. Miller was invalided on December 15, 1864 and allowed to return to his home at Milledgeville where he remained until the end of the war.

A scarce postmark from an identified Confederate soldier who was wounded and captured at Vicksburg, but a little raggedly, so priced accordingly.

Price: $200.00

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