Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century. K. G. Feick.
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century
Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century

Exceptional photograph album documenting college-life in the first quarter of the 20th Century

Capital College, Bexley, Ohio: 1918-1923. Album. The album measures 10” x 7” and contains over 280 photographs ranging in size from 1” x 1.5” to 7” x 5”. The photos are glued to the pages; all are captioned. There are several newspaper clippings attached to the pages and laid-in. A program for the 1923 football game against Otterbein (Capital’s biggest rival) is attached inside the rear cover. Everything is in nice shape. Very good. Item #009228

Capital College (today Capital University) was founded in 1830 as the Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod in Ohio over forty years before The Ohio State University began to take shape. It is the oldest university in Central Ohio and the largest Lutheran college in the United States. Freick is the likely compiler of this album as tick-marks have been placed by his name in many of the newspaper clippings. It began accepting women in 1918, the year Feick began assembling this album. Three of the 32 members of Feick’s graduating class were female, and they are included in the cameos of the graduates apparently removed from a school yearbook.

The album contains photos of the campus, faculty members, students, and all aspects of college life. There are many team and individual portraits of football, tennis, baseball, basketball players. There are numerous photos of other extracurricular as well including the band, a fraternal organization, the glee club, and cheerleaders. Several images show the Student Army Training Corps (S.A.T.C.), a World War One forerunner of ROTC. One image shows the college May Pole and another shows three coeds studying under a tree. Several photos show students preparing to build tennis courts for the school and another group documents a visit to the campus by Warren Harding.

Of special interest are a series of about 20 photographs of class rushes. While today, the term ‘rush’ refers to an aspect of Greek life that was not the case in the past. Class rushes were all-out organized, school sponsored fights or battles between students. At Capital, apparently two different rushes were held, a “cane rush” and a “sack rush.” In cane rushes, usually a member of one class would brandish a cane at a large school event, perhaps right after chapel on Sunday, and shout something like “The freshman have the cane and the sophomores don’t.” This challenge would then be taken to the quad or other open area one campus where the students would beat each other’s’ brains out until one class retained the cane and the other acknowledged defeat. A “sack rush” was slightly less violent. Generally, a number of large canvas sacks would be arranged on the ground and two classes would face off against each other. When the contest began, the students would rush to the sacks and attempt to drag them to their class’s goal line and multiple tugs-of-war would be fought.

Price: $500.00

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