“THANK YOU” CORRESPONDENCE FROM THE AMERICAN FEMALE GUARDIAN SOCIETY AND HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS; Thank-you grouping consisting of a Female Guardian Society advertising cover, a two-page letter written on the organization’s stationery, and a religious tract

“THANK YOU” CORRESPONDENCE FROM THE AMERICAN FEMALE GUARDIAN SOCIETY AND HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS; Thank-you grouping consisting of a Female Guardian Society advertising cover, a two-page letter written on the organization’s stationery, and a religious tract

New York: 1879. Unbound. This thank-you grouping consists of a Female Guardian Society advertising cover, a two-page letter written on the organization’s stationery, and a religious tract. All in very nice shape. Very good. Item #008925

In 1834 a group of women established the Female Moral Reform Society of New York with the goal of reforming prostitutes in New York City and improving the morality of the population in general. Society members visited the city’s slums and prisons to distribute tracts, preach, and counsel the poor.

By 1840, the society had established a “respectable” women’s employment agency, begun to distribute food and clothing and changed its name to the American Female Guardian Society. Members often took destitute women and children into their homes to remove them from the streets, but in time, the effort became overwhelming, so in 1847 they opened a Home for the Friendless and House of Industry in a rented building on First Avenue until they were able to build a facility of their own on 30th Street just east of Madison Avenue. Most residents were widows, mothers with dependent children, and adolescent girls seeking employment. The Home also accepted orphaned or abandoned children, both girls and boys.

Residence was never intended to be permanent, and many children were placed on the orphan trains first established by the Children’s Aid Society and sent west for adoption or employment. Still, demand for space at the home far exceeded its capacity, and a new facility was built in the Bronx in 1901.

Price: $200.00