Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U) meeting notes

Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U) meeting notes

Dallas, Texas: 1899-1901. Unbound. Approximately 40 pages of meeting notes, from the Dallas chapter of the W.C.T.U. Rules from and two news clippings about the 17th Annual Convention are also included. All of the items are affixed to twelve unbound scrapbook pages. The meeting notes and rules sheet are in good shape; the news clippings are brittle. Very good. Item #008822

The meeting notes and minutes are generally generally concise, and often include members names. Many of the entries are procedural in nature, and several describe presentations, e.g. the testimonial of a long-suffering temperance worker who “had been laboring in Temperance work without the Lord but now [that] she had him on her side, had accomplished more for him and all others that she was working for.” There is no discussion of suffrage, but other Union efforts are mentioned including: Pledge cards and new members, White membership ribbons , Temperance literature, Scientific temperance instruction, Loyal Temerance Legion (the W.C.T.U.’s children’s branch), Flower Mission (the distribution of bouquets along with temperance literature and religious tracts to prisons, poor houses, hospitals, fire stations, jails, “colored people,” etc), Fund raising (solicitation of donations from individuals and businesses, sales of Francis Willard –the W.C.T.U. founder—buttons, etc.), Lobbying state representatives in support of anti- tobacco, cocaine, morphine, and opium laws, Lobbying state representatives to establish a “Girls Educational Colage (sic),” Organizing a Humane Society in Dallas, Petitioning “the commissioner’s court to have the White Females separated from the colored females,” Petitioning to prevent the elected representative from Utah, Brigham. H. Thomas, from being allowed to take his seat in Congress because he was a practicing Mormon polygamist. Petitioning to abolish “beer and other intoxicants” from Army canteens , and Lobbying state representative to pass a law “to make the delivery of jugs a bonified sale, and to put the talk on them so high that there would be no whiskey sent that way to any local . . . district.

Price: $750.00