Speech of Hon. Sam Houston, of Texas, Exposing the Malfeasance and Corruption of John Charles Watrous, Judge of the Federal Court in Texas, and of His Confederates. Delivered in the Senate of the United States, Feb. 3, 1859. Samuel "Sam" Houston.
Speech of Hon. Sam Houston, of Texas, Exposing the Malfeasance and Corruption of John Charles Watrous, Judge of the Federal Court in Texas, and of His Confederates. Delivered in the Senate of the United States, Feb. 3, 1859.
Speech of Hon. Sam Houston, of Texas, Exposing the Malfeasance and Corruption of John Charles Watrous, Judge of the Federal Court in Texas, and of His Confederates. Delivered in the Senate of the United States, Feb. 3, 1859.
Speech of Hon. Sam Houston, of Texas, Exposing the Malfeasance and Corruption of John Charles Watrous, Judge of the Federal Court in Texas, and of His Confederates. Delivered in the Senate of the United States, Feb. 3, 1859.

Speech of Hon. Sam Houston, of Texas, Exposing the Malfeasance and Corruption of John Charles Watrous, Judge of the Federal Court in Texas, and of His Confederates. Delivered in the Senate of the United States, Feb. 3, 1859.

New York: Pudney & Russell, 1860. First Edition. 1/4 leather. Approximately 5” x 7.5”. Complete with iii introductory pages including the half-title, tissue-protected frontispiece portrait of Sam Houston, and 100 text pages. Marbled paper covered boards with later half-cloth spine covering. Bright gilt lettering on spine. Very good condition. Sound binding with intact hinges. All pages and frontispiece are attached; a blank front flyleaf is just starting to detach. Very good. Item #008804

See Howes H-690.

Watrous arrived in Texas in 1837 and soon became involved in several land companies as a lawyer, shareholder, and part owner. He became the Texas attorney general in 1838, but only served two years when conflicts arose between his public duty and land company entanglements.

He soon became a legal advisor for the Peters Colony of the Texas Land and Emigration Company and remained in that position until 1846 when he pulled strings with an old friend, the new President, James K. Polk, to secure an appointment as a U.S. District Judge. Both Texas senators and many other Texas politicians opposed his appointment in part because they favored another candidate, but primarily because of personal, vested connection with land speculators and charges, unproven but likely true, that he had attempted to validate forged land certificates.

The House of Representatives initiated impeachment hearings in 1851, however the case against him was eventually dropped in 1858. His opponents continued their campaign against Watrous, and Senator Sam Houston’s vitriolic and convincing attack upon him in this speech on the Senate floor in 1859 convinced many the charges were true, and impeachment hearings were reinitiated, but once more the investigation was dropped when Congress adjourned in the Spring of 1861 as the Civil War began.

Throughout the war, Watrous was denied a seat on the bench by the Confederate government but he resumed his old position in 1865 and served until 1869 when medical problems forced him to resign.

Quite scarce. As of 2018, the Rare Book Hub shows only one auction record and no examples are currently available for sale. OCLC shows many digital and reprint copies but only one original book, which is held by the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.

Price: $750.00

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