Report on the resolution of an unpaid debt that was secured by the use of “several negroes” as collateral. J. J. Watts John Howie.
Report on the resolution of an unpaid debt that was secured by the use of “several negroes” as collateral
Report on the resolution of an unpaid debt that was secured by the use of “several negroes” as collateral
Report on the resolution of an unpaid debt that was secured by the use of “several negroes” as collateral

Report on the resolution of an unpaid debt that was secured by the use of “several negroes” as collateral

Marion, Alabama: The Mobile Br Bank, May 14th 1847. Unbound.

This three-page report on the resolution of a debt and mortgage related to “several negroes" is datelined “Marion May 14th 1847 / The Mobile Bank vs John Howie, J.J. Watts & Allen Houston.” The report was sent as a stampless letter from Marion to Mobile. It bears a manuscript “5” rate mark and a circular, black Marion postmark dated May 15. In nice shape with some docketing and light wear.

It appears that in December 1844, Howie and Watts were served with a judgement of $1169.78, for a loan from The Mobile Branch Bank, and by the following year, it had been increased to $1548.91. Apparently, Howie was owed money by the estate of another man named Earley. The executor of the Earley estate obtained a loan with

“a mortgage of several negroes intended as a security for Earley’s liability for Howie. The deed was denied by Mr. Watts as intended to secure Earley – He had bought the negroes, & again sold them.

And . . . at least one lawsuit ensued. Attempts at reconciliation were suggested including that

“the Bank could obtain a deed of trust upon the negroes . . . and all litigation stopped.“. Very good. Item #009600

The second half of the report discussing the resolution of the debt is even more confusing to my non-legal brain then the first, but the take away today is that the nonchalance in discussing the fate of “several negroes,” who are not even named, underscores the nature of chattel slavery without even trying. People were bought, sold, and traded just like cattle, land, furniture, precious metals, or other property without any consideration of their humanity.

Price: $200.00

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